I’m taking the liberty to post on this again, as I’m really interested in this.
"The baby false killer whale currently under care at the Vancouver Aquarium Marine Mammal Rescue Centre remains in critical condition, however we are pleased with his progress so far. He has gained some weight, his respirations have improved, and his buoyancy continues to improve slowly. He has a long road ahead to recovery, but we are happy with these improvements.”

I’m taking the liberty to post on this again, as I’m really interested in this.

"The baby false killer whale currently under care at the Vancouver Aquarium Marine Mammal Rescue Centre remains in critical condition, however we are pleased with his progress so far. He has gained some weight, his respirations have improved, and his buoyancy continues to improve slowly. He has a long road ahead to recovery, but we are happy with these improvements.”

52orcas
52orcas:

26. Malia
In the wild, mother orcas pass their parenting knowledge on to their calves, a lifelong bond that is critical for the success of the species. However, over multiple generations of captive breeding in marine parks, this bond is apparently deteriorating. A prime example of such social abnormality is exhibited by the young orca Malia. Malia is a second generation captive-bred orca born to Taima (deceased). A few months after Malia was born, her mother began acting aggressively towards her and repeatedly chased her, raked her with her teeth, and even beached her. As a consequence, Malia grew up fast and began eating fish and acting independent at 4 months old.  At the age of 2, Malia started showing abnormal behaviors, floating listlessly in her pool in a tranced state. If one day she becomes a mother, will Malia know how to raise her calf?

Geez, it would be nice if you knew what you were talking about.Malia’s mother, Taima, was violent with her calves for one reason - her little sister.
When Taima was little, her mother had another calf who was born sick (this would have happened in the wild as well), and mom Gudrun does what animals sometimes do with sick offspring - she tried to kill her. Taima saw this, and thought that’s how you care for calves. So, that’s what she did with hers.
It has nothing to do with “generations of captivity fucked them up”.

52orcas:

26. Malia

In the wild, mother orcas pass their parenting knowledge on to their calves, a lifelong bond that is critical for the success of the species. However, over multiple generations of captive breeding in marine parks, this bond is apparently deteriorating. A prime example of such social abnormality is exhibited by the young orca Malia. Malia is a second generation captive-bred orca born to Taima (deceased). A few months after Malia was born, her mother began acting aggressively towards her and repeatedly chased her, raked her with her teeth, and even beached her. As a consequence, Malia grew up fast and began eating fish and acting independent at 4 months old.  At the age of 2, Malia started showing abnormal behaviors, floating listlessly in her pool in a tranced state. If one day she becomes a mother, will Malia know how to raise her calf?

Geez, it would be nice if you knew what you were talking about.
Malia’s mother, Taima, was violent with her calves for one reason - her little sister.

When Taima was little, her mother had another calf who was born sick (this would have happened in the wild as well), and mom Gudrun does what animals sometimes do with sick offspring - she tried to kill her. Taima saw this, and thought that’s how you care for calves. So, that’s what she did with hers.

It has nothing to do with “generations of captivity fucked them up”.

52orcas
52orcas:

28. Kohana
Kohana was conceived through artificial insemination and was born at SeaWorld San Diego. At only 3 years old, SeaWorld separated Kohana from her mother (Takara) and was shipped via air craft to Loro Parque marine park in Spain, where she lives today. At only 8 years of age, Kohana gave birth to her first calf, but never learning from Takara how to rear a calf, she rejected her first born. The calf was also a product of inbreeding since the father of the calf (Keto) is Kohana’s maternal uncle. Kohana is known for being a very lively orca who enjoys swimming close to the glass and interacting with park guests.

To be fair, she was 3 years and 9 months old when she moved to Loro Parque, and her calves were not really inbred - Keto is not her uncle, he is her half-uncle. He shares a father with Kohana’s mother, and this makes Kohana as related to him as to a cousin, and cousin breedings are legal in humans.

52orcas:

28. Kohana

Kohana was conceived through artificial insemination and was born at SeaWorld San Diego. At only 3 years old, SeaWorld separated Kohana from her mother (Takara) and was shipped via air craft to Loro Parque marine park in Spain, where she lives today. At only 8 years of age, Kohana gave birth to her first calf, but never learning from Takara how to rear a calf, she rejected her first born. The calf was also a product of inbreeding since the father of the calf (Keto) is Kohana’s maternal uncle. Kohana is known for being a very lively orca who enjoys swimming close to the glass and interacting with park guests.

To be fair, she was 3 years and 9 months old when she moved to Loro Parque, and her calves were not really inbred - Keto is not her uncle, he is her half-uncle. He shares a father with Kohana’s mother, and this makes Kohana as related to him as to a cousin, and cousin breedings are legal in humans.

everythingisahoax

everythingisahoax:

"I lowered the camera so that our eyes could meet once again, I noticed his eye moving along the length of my body before returning to meet my gaze. As I reflect upon that moment and reconsider the question, ‘What does it feel like [to be so close to whales]?’ the only word that comes to mind is ‘disturbing.’"

-Bryant Austin

Those are some truly amazing photos. Comparing to a picture I’ve seen before, the name of that humpback is Mozart. :)

The false killer whale calf rescued by Vancouver Aquarium is making progress. From their Facebook page:

"Update: the baby false killer whale currently under care at the Vancouver Aquarium Marine Mammal Rescue Centre had a calm night last night. We continue to allow him to float on his own for very short periods of time, although he always has someone in the water with him day and night. His eyes are open more often and he’s curious about his surroundings. He remains in critical condition but we are pleased with his progress.”

On July 26 Vancouver politicians will make a decision about whether we should continue to save whales.” (!!!)

kyrrahaf

kyrrahaf:

Tilikum should have more space; everyone can agree on this. But we have so many people screaming for his release, and barring his health issues and aversion to change, and the other dozen reasons why he shouldn’t be released, there is a topic that not enough people know about.

We have Tilikum, who has made very deep bonds with a couple of his trainers. If you’ve hung out on my blog enough, you’d see that I love his and Daniel’s relationship. They feed off of one another’s energy, and oftentimes I’ll see Tilly not want to perform for anyone but Daniel. It’s very impressive and touching. Tilikum has Trua in direct contact with him, other whales to communicate with between gates, and trainers that he is emotionally invested in. 

Now we have Kshamenk. A whale who was captured later than many whales at age 5, and who is infamous for not having a relationship with any of his trainers. He is borderline aggressive with them and has made it clear he has minimal bonds with any of them. He is kept in a small facility in Argentina that is not fit for a bull that weights almost four tons. This park, Marino Mundo, also shows signs of poor water quality. The only companionship he has are with dolphins. While his physical and dental health both seem good, he clearly deserves more than some dolphin tankmates and trainers that he can’t connect to. 

So when people want to shout about freeing a whale, they should be directed to petitions to help Kshamenk, because he’s a big boy that really deserves to have his voice be heard.

Watched the Desolation of Smaug for the first time since December yesterday, and had to printscreen these little gems (plus two more).

Both times watching it, I was like “He’s so beautiful… *_* …but he’s an asshole.”

Yes, I luv dragons, especially the two-legged, batlike kind, especially the well-made kind, especially the big and fierce kind, especially the huge wingspan kind, and Smaug is all of these.